What is Rehabilitation?

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What is Rehabilitation? 2017-04-23T03:45:00+00:00

what is rehab reducing pain dog quartet vetPhysical rehabilitation is the treatment of injury or illness to decrease pain and restore function. A rehabilitation veterinarian treats acute injuries soon after they have occurred and chronic injuries or diseases that have been affecting your pet for a long time.

Rest alone after injury usually does not relieve the problems caused by inflammation and spasm; for example, a muscle in spasm cannot get adequate blood supply to heal. The body adapts and protects the injured area long after healing has started. These protective mechanisms alter movement of the whole musculoskeletal system and increase strain on other areas. Rehabilitation should start as soon as possible after injury.

 Dr. Jennifer Shults is a rehabilitation-trained veterinarian and is a muscle, tendon, ligament, nerve and bone expert who uses physical medicine to restore maximal function and relieve pain. She will perform a diagnostic evaluation prior to designing a treatment plan to include whole body care, prescribing needed medicines and hands-on treatment for your pet. Rehabilitation patients are usually referred by a primary veterinary or a veterinary specialist, and working with these other veterinarians to the benefit of the patients is essential to successful treatment of the patient. Dr. Shults’ and her staff work closely with these other clinicians to provide care with your pet’s best interests at heart.

When you and your pet first visit Veterinary Rehabilitation and Pain Management, you will undergo an initial consultation. The doctor will take a history asking detailed questions about your pet’s lifestyle and your expectations. Following this, they will perform a thorough physical examination of your pet. The examination will include many measurements. A specific program will then be designed to meet your pet’s needs. Examples of conditions which can be treated are listed under Conditions Treated.

Conditions Treated

Some of these conditions may require surgical treatment in conjunction with rehabilitation. This list is not exhaustive. Contact Veterinary Rehabilitation and Pain Management for more info.

This is the most common chronic condition of the joints, it occurs when the cartilage or cushion between joints breaks down leading to pain, stiffness and swelling, pain.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • increased mobility
  • range of motion
  • decreased inflammation
  • decreased need for medications
TREATMENT BENEFITS

Weight loss programs can be designed for each individual.

This is an abnormal formation of the hip socket that, in its more severe form, can eventually cause crippling lameness and painful arthritis of the joints.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • builds supporting muscle mass
  • increased mobility & comfort
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • speeds healing
  • decreases inflammation
  • prevents scarring
  • restores normal functional length
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • increased muscle support to prevent re-injury
  • manage pain
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • decreased spasticity
  • pain management
  • earlier ambulation
This is a spinal condition mostly seen in senior dogs, is a degenerative condition that usually occurs most along the underside of the spine.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • manage pain
  • maintain flexibility and strength
This is the artificial induction of joint ossification between two bones by surgery. This is done to relieve intractable pain in a joint which cannot be managed by pain medication, splints, or other normally indicated treatments.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • faster adaptation
  • support of surrounding joints
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • faster adaptation
  • improves coordination & strength
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  •  faster recovery
  • prevents muscle contracture
Cranial Cruciate Ligament, or CCL – similar to the ACL in humans. This ligament connects the back of the femur (the bone above the knee) with the front of the tibia (the bone below the knee). The CCL is responsible for keeping the tibia in place beneath the femur and stabilizing the knee joint.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • speeds and improves recovery
  • restores extension
  • decreases inflammation
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • adaptation
  • builds supporting muscles
  • management of pain
Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD or OD) is an inflammatory condition that occurs when the diseased cartilage separates from the underlying bone. It most commonly affects the shoulder joint but the elbow, hip, or knee (stifle) may also be involved.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • increased mobility
  • strengthening
Elbow dysplasia (ED) is a disease of the elbows of dogs caused by growth disturbances in the elbow joint.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • increased mobility
  • decreased inflammation
  • strengthening
TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • strengthens supporting muscles & ligaments
  • prevents re-injury
The patella, or kneecap, is part of the stifle joint (knee). In patellar luxation, the kneecap luxates, or pops out of place, either in a medial or lateral position.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • strengthening of quadriceps
  • prevents re-injury
Most tendon injuries occur near joints, such as the shoulder, elbow, knee, and ankle. A tendon injury may seem to happen suddenly, but usually it is the result of many tiny tears to the tendon that have happened over time.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • increased range of motion and strength
  • decreased inflammation and scar tissue
Peripheral nerve injuries may result in loss of motor function, sensory function, or both. Such injuries may occur as a result of trauma (blunt or penetrating) or acute compression.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • speeds recovery
  • functional adaptation
  • manages pain
Dogs or cats with neuromuscular disorder present with varying degree of muscle weakness and muscle wastage. This muscle weakness can affect the limbs so that animals are unable to stand or exercise normally but can also affect other muscles in the body.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • strengthening
  • adaptation
  • pain management
FCE is a blockage in a blood vessel in the spinal cord. When such a blockage occurs, an area of the spinal cord dies. An FCE typically results from an injury to the spinal cord caused by jumping or landing awkwardly.

TREATMENT BENEFITS
  • can hasten recovery
  • improve coordination
DM is also known as chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy, is an incurable, progressive disease of the canine spinal cord that is similar in many ways to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Onset is typically after the age of 7 years.

TREATMENT BENEFIT
  • helps to maintain muscle function and prolong life
This is caused by compression of the nerve roots passing from the lower back toward the tail at the level of the lumbosacral junction (just in front of the tail). The most common cause of Cauda Equina Syndrome is narrowing of the vertebral canal at the level of the lumbosacral joint (called lumbosacral stenosis). The most common neurologic sign associated with CES is pain in the lower back. Signs of pain may include decreased willingness to jump up or climb up stairs, low tail carriage or reduced tail wagging, difficulty posturing to defecate, and whimpering/crying if the lower back is touched.

TREATMENT BENEFIT
  • manages pain
  • maintains strength and function
The vestibular system includes the parts of the inner ear and brain that process the sensory information involved with controlling balance and eye movements. If disease or injury damages these processing areas, vestibular disorders can result.

TREATMENT BENEFIT
  • improves balance and coordination
  • decreases injury

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